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SqueakyRat (Offline)
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08-10-2010, 01:04 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by YuriTokoro View Post
Guten Morgen!
Are their origin Latin?
Among others, yes. Nowadays I see quite a few younger parents giving their kids american influenced names though.

Quote:
When I write “Der Name bedeutet Fisherman (or some other profession)" would you understand what the sentence means easily?
Yes, although...

Quote:
Both German and English have the word [fisherman], and mean the same! Wow!
That is not correct, I'm sorry, when I wrote 'fisherman' that was just the english translation for [Fischer]. The German word for fisherman is, well, [Fischer], just like the name. They apparently didn't have a lot of imagination back in the day, regarding family names.

In that regard one could say your example sentence is a little redundant as it's obvious that the name [Fischer] is derieved from the profession [Fischer].

I did a little research on a few of the names I gave you in my previous post. Natalie for example is supposedly derieved from the latin 'Dies Natalis' which means birthday. (Geburtstag in German.)

That one might be more appropriate to use in your sentence, as the meaning of the name isn't as obvious.

Quote:
Verstand is not common for a meaning of a name. Is this right?
Correct.

Quote:
Do you know a name from Zimmermann?
What exactly do you mean? Just like [Fischer], [Zimmerman] is both the term for a profession, (The english word for it is 'carpenter'.) and a family name.

Quote:
Now, I think I’ve finished making example sentences with der Name. (You really helped me. )

The name means fisherman. = Der Name bedeutet Fisherman.

The meaning of the name is carpenter. = Die Bedeutung des Namens ist Zimmermann.

He enters up in the name of Müller. =Er trägt sich unter dem Namen Müller ein.

I remember the name. =Ich erinnere mich an den Namen.
(merken = memorize erinnern = remember)

The names bring me back to the memory. =Die Namen wecken Erinnerungen.

The announcement of the names caused a lot of disturbance.
     = Die Bekanntmachung der Namen sorgte für viel Beunruhigung.

I've applied for both of us, using my parents’ names.= Ich habe uns mit den Namen meiner Eltern angemeldet.


He writes the names on the paper. =Er schreibt die Namen auf das Papier.
Don't forget to change Fisherman into Fischer (Or maybe use the example with Natalie as stated before.) otherwise they're all correct.

Quote:
This is very useful information.
Danke, sehr nett von Ihnen.
Thanks, again!
Bis Spaeter!
Jo, bis später.

Oh and, it might be a bit too much for now to explain when to use Sie/Ihnen instead of Du/Dir in regular conversation, but on internet message boards like this it's always appropriate to use the more casual forms Du/Dir.
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YuriTokoro (Offline)
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08-10-2010, 02:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SqueakyRat View Post
That is not correct, I'm sorry, when I wrote 'fisherman' that was just the english translation for [Fischer]. The German word for fisherman is, well, [Fischer], just like the name. They apparently didn't have a lot of imagination back in the day, regarding family names.

In that regard one could say your example sentence is a little redundant as it's obvious that the name [Fischer] is derieved from the profession [Fischer].

I did a little research on a few of the names I gave you in my previous post. Natalie for example is supposedly derieved from the latin 'Dies Natalis' which means birthday. (Geburtstag in German.)

That one might be more appropriate to use in your sentence, as the meaning of the name isn't as obvious.
Danke! I will use the name.
Thank you for researching.

Quote:
What exactly do you mean? Just like [Fischer], [Zimmerman] is both the term for a profession, (The english word for it is 'carpenter'.) and a family name.
I thought there was a Family name which was from Zimmerman, because I thought Fischer was from fisherman.
Now, I've got to know Zimmerman can mean both a profession and a name; I don’t think I should use the word in the example sentence.

Quote:
Don't forget to change Fisherman into Fischer (Or maybe use the example with Natalie as stated before.) otherwise they're all correct.
The name means birthday. = Der Name bedeutet Geburtstag.

The meaning of the name is birthday. = Die Bedeutung des Namens ist Geburtstag.

Danke schön!
Thank you for being so kind.

Quote:
Oh and, it might be a bit too much for now to explain when to use Sie/Ihnen instead of Du/Dir in regular conversation, but on internet message boards like this it's always appropriate to use the more casual forms Du/Dir.
I will try to use Du.
Vielen Danke!


(When I went to a coffee shop in Hamburg, I heard a customer saying this word to the shopkeeper. )
Tschüss!


Hello, I may not understand English very well and I may lack words but I will try to understand you.

If you have questions about my post or Japanese customs, don't hesitate to ask.

I YamaP

Last edited by YuriTokoro : 08-10-2010 at 02:21 PM.
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YuriTokoro (Offline)
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08-12-2010, 01:06 PM

Guten Tag! 

I’m making example sentences to learn the German grammar.
Today’s word is “der Mann”.
Could someone correct my German?


The man is a company worker. =Der Mann ist Angesteller.

The man goes to a company. = Der Mann geht zur Firma

The man has learned economics. = Der Mann hat Wirtschaft gelernt.


The workplace of the man is in Berlin. =Der Arbeitsplats des mannes ist in Berlin.

One of the friends of the man lives in Berlin. = Einer der Freunde des Mannes lebt in Berlin.
The boss of the man has gone into politics. =Der Chef des Mannes ist in Politik eingetreten.


The car belongs to the man. =Das Auto gehört dem Mann.

The boss has appointed the man for the job. = Der Chef hat zum(zu dem) Mann für den Job ernannt.


The company employs the man. = Die Firma beschäftigt den Mann.


Danke! 


Hello, I may not understand English very well and I may lack words but I will try to understand you.

If you have questions about my post or Japanese customs, don't hesitate to ask.

I YamaP
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SqueakyRat (Offline)
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08-12-2010, 03:13 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by YuriTokoro View Post
The man is a company worker. =Der Mann ist Angesteller.
Correct.

Quote:
The man goes to a company. = Der Mann geht zur Firma.
It's a perfectly fine sentence, just not an exact translation of the english one, what you wrote literally means 'The man goes to the company'. An exact translation would be [Der Mann geht zu einer Firma.]

Quote:
The man has learned economics. = Der Mann hat Wirtschaft gelernt.
Correct.

Quote:
The workplace of the man is in Berlin. =Der Arbeitsplats des mannes ist in Berlin.
Just two minor spelling mistakes, otherwise correct.

[Arbeitsplatz; [Mannes]

Quote:
One of the friends of the man lives in Berlin. = Einer der Freunde des Mannes lebt in Berlin.
Correct.

Quote:
The boss of the man has gone into politics. =Der Chef des Mannes ist in Politik eingetreten.
Almost correct. [in die Politik]

Quote:
The car belongs to the man. =Das Auto gehört dem Mann.
Correct.

Quote:
The boss has appointed the man for the job. = Der Chef hat zum(zu dem) Mann für den Job ernannt.
Almost. [Der Chef hat den Mann für den Job eingestellt.]

(The word [ernannt] that you used isn't necessarily incorrect, but it's mostly used for civil servants, government officials, politicians and the likes.)

If you need another sentence with [dem] you could say: [Der Mann wurde vom (von dem) Chef eingestellt.]

Or, if you need [dem Mann]: [Der Chef gab dem Mann einen Job.]

Quote:
The company employs the man. = Die Firma beschäftigt den Mann.
Correct.

Good job Yuri, almost all your sentences were correct from the start.


Last edited by SqueakyRat : 08-12-2010 at 03:20 PM.
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YuriTokoro (Offline)
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08-13-2010, 01:17 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SqueakyRat View Post
Good job Yuri, almost all your sentences were correct from the start.

SqueakyRat, Vielen Danke!


Hello, I may not understand English very well and I may lack words but I will try to understand you.

If you have questions about my post or Japanese customs, don't hesitate to ask.

I YamaP
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08-14-2010, 04:34 AM

I admire you Yuri, learning English and now German XD Amazing!!

Best wishes!!


My Life Sucks- The kids I babysit have drooled, ripped or drawn on all of the cards and put the cars with the little people in the microwave!

I have no Friends- The cats have scratched and destroyed all of the DVDs!

I always owe someone- In fact I put two os in it!

I always ruin my clothes with Bleach!- The show is so dom suspensful I spill my grape soda on them!

But . . .I'll live.
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08-14-2010, 04:43 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by manganimefan227 View Post
I admire you Yuri, learning English and now German XD Amazing!!

Best wishes!!
Thanks !


Hello, I may not understand English very well and I may lack words but I will try to understand you.

If you have questions about my post or Japanese customs, don't hesitate to ask.

I YamaP
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YuriTokoro (Offline)
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08-14-2010, 06:52 AM

Guten Tag!

I’m making example sentences to learn the German grammar.
Today’s word is “Die Männer”(plural form).
Could someone correct my German?


The men are farmers. = Die Männer sind Landwirte.

The men go to the fields. = Die Männer gehen zu den Feldern.

The men harvest some vegetables. = Die Männer ernten einige Gemüse.

The men have harvested some vegetables. = Die Männer haben einige Gemüse geerntet.


The fields of the men are large. = Die Felder der Männer sind groß.


I help the men. = Ich helfe den Männern.

I have helped the men. = Ich habe den Männern geholfen.


The landlord sells the fields to the men. = Der Wirt verkauft die Felder an die Männer.

The landlord has sold the fields to the men. = Der Wirt hat die Felder an die Männer.

Danke schön!


Hello, I may not understand English very well and I may lack words but I will try to understand you.

If you have questions about my post or Japanese customs, don't hesitate to ask.

I YamaP
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SqueakyRat (Offline)
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08-14-2010, 08:14 PM

N'abend.

Quote:
The men harvest some vegetables. = Die Männer ernten einige Gemüse.
Almost, [einige] is incorrect. I was about to say [einiges] but now that I think about it, I'm not entirely sure if that's correct either, it still sounds a bit weird. I have heard it enough times in similar cases (From native speakers.) and I myself would probably use it (As a native speaker.) but it might actually be incorrect from a grammatical viewpoint and we just get away with it in colloquial speech. I'm not sure. For now better use [ein wenig] or [ein bisschen]. Those two are correct.

Quote:
The men have harvested some vegetables. = Die Männer haben einige Gemüse geerntet.
Same as above.

Quote:
The landlord sells the fields to the men. = Der Wirt verkauft die Felder an die Männer.
A more fitting translation for landlord would be [Grundstückbesitzer] in this case.

You can also say [Der Grundstückbesitzer verkauft den Männern die Felder.] It sounds a little bit better I think, but your sentence is correct as well.

Quote:
The landlord has sold the fields to the men. = Der Wirt hat die Felder an die Männer.
Same here.

You can also say [Der Grundstückbesitzer hat den Männern die Felder verkauft.] And again, both versions are correct.

Your other sentences are all correct. I see you're making progress.
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YuriTokoro (Offline)
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08-15-2010, 02:15 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SqueakyRat View Post
N'abend.

Almost, [einige] is incorrect. I was about to say [einiges] but now that I think about it, I'm not entirely sure if that's correct either, it still sounds a bit weird. I have heard it enough times in similar cases (From native speakers.) and I myself would probably use it (As a native speaker.) but it might actually be incorrect from a grammatical viewpoint and we just get away with it in colloquial speech. I'm not sure. For now better use [ein wenig] or [ein bisschen]. Those two are correct.
Guten Morgen!

I see. My German is not that advanced to understand [ein wenig] or [ein bisschen]. My dictionary has [wenig] and [bisschen], but not [ein wenig] or [ein bisschen].
Now, how about this?
The men harvest vegetables. = Die Männer ernten Gemüse.

The men have harvested vegetables. = Die Männer haben Gemüse geerntet.

Quote:
A more fitting translation for landlord would be [Grundstückbesitzer] in this case.

You can also say [Der Grundstückbesitzer verkauft den Männern die Felder.] It sounds a little bit better I think, but your sentence is correct as well.
OK.
The landlord sells the fields to the men.= Der Grundstückbesitzer verkauft den Männern die Felder.

The landlord has sold the fields to the men.= Der Grundstückbesitzer hat den Männern die Felder verkauft.

Here, I need some other sentences with [die Männer] instead of [The landlord sells the fields to the men. = Der Wirt verkauft die Felder an die Männer.]

Hmm… I can’t find any sentences with [die Männer]. I have spent one hour, but still I can’t.
Could you give me one?

Quote:
Your other sentences are all correct. I see you're making progress.
Thanks.
The German grammar is really difficult, but I’m trying to learn it!


Hello, I may not understand English very well and I may lack words but I will try to understand you.

If you have questions about my post or Japanese customs, don't hesitate to ask.

I YamaP
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