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dogsbody70 (Offline)
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changes in the English Language - 09-24-2010, 02:20 PM

As there are a few lessons going on re - ENGLISH LANGUAGE

I thought perhaps a thread about the ongoing use and changes of English language maybe useful.

I notice that here in UK we seem to invariably pick up many americanisms almost without realising it .


"Something Else" became common for a while then it arrived here. Meaning that something was very special or "Cool." Now many youngsters refer to something being "Wicked" in other words it is "Great" or "fabulous" Maybe NOw "AWESOME" is Popular.

"Brill" or Brilliant was very common at one time also. we might have once said it was FANTASTIC.

I am fascinated with the constant changes of language and the influence of America in particular-- due, I suspect to the amount of American programmes shown here in UK.


MY ears tell me that we Brits speak quite differently from Americans.


Some of our spelling differs also.

One recent expression that surprises me is that when asking some one how they are? they will often say "GOOD>" Now === we always would have answered "I'm fine thanks." or "Not too bad thankyou--------why GOOD? surely "Good" means ones Behaviour.


Maybe some young members can fill me in with some modern expressions of which I am ignorant. I have six gr. children but they Have their own language ha ha.

Last edited by dogsbody70 : 09-24-2010 at 02:23 PM.
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09-24-2010, 02:39 PM

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Originally Posted by dogsbody70 View Post
One recent expression that surprises me is that when asking some one how they are? they will often say "GOOD>" Now === we always would have answered "I'm fine thanks." or "Not too bad thankyou--------why GOOD? surely "Good" means ones Behaviour.


Maybe some young members can fill me in with some modern expressions of which I am ignorant. I have six gr. children but they Have their own language ha ha.
Ha ha, that's very amusing. I'm about 20, so I consider myself somewhere in between. "Good", in this case, I think refers to one's circumstances or situation or state or condition, etc.

I'd say some disciplines in the English language are indefinite and relative, but there are certain irrefutable constants throughout, although I'm not quite sure for how long they'll remain irrefutable myself.

Personally, I, too, tend to use these new lingo or slangs on a normal basis, but I try to stick with the formalities when the occasion calls for it. I feel that's what most youths would do, anyway.


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09-24-2010, 02:55 PM

It's bound to come seeing as most of our prominent TV shows are from America. But it was awesome to click this thread and see 'Brill'. Haha, I still use it, I used it in Japan 2 weeks ago! Hehehe. I also use 'Ace' alot still.

But we Brits still have ALOT of our own slang, and I even heard many people from other English-speaking countries using our own slang when I was on my Japan travels, mainly Australians and Kiwis.


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09-24-2010, 05:13 PM

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Originally Posted by StueyT View Post
But we Brits still have ALOT of our own slang, and I even heard many people from other English-speaking countries using our own slang when I was on my Japan travels, mainly Australians and Kiwis.
We also still have a lot of ~regional~ slang too. People my way might still say something's 'well pants' (bad), declare 'that's the badger' (right, that's what i was trying to say) or that my snazzy new t-shirt is 'gert-lush' (fantastic).

Wouldn't mean much to some people outside the county, let alone out the country! And that's just from one small area in my county. There's several other dialects too, all with their own slang conventions and trends.
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09-24-2010, 05:54 PM

from America

"How are you?" -> "Whats up?" or "How ya doing?"
"I am fine" -> "Its' good" or "everything's cool"
"something amazing" -> "sick"
"I'm sorry" -> "My bad"



From Japan

Honestly speaking -> butchake
extremely [.....] -> Cho [....]
for reals? -> maji?
disgusting -> kimo


* I like 'Bril' "Man, that's bril dude!"


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09-24-2010, 09:11 PM

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Originally Posted by Columbine View Post
We also still have a lot of ~regional~ slang too. People my way might still say something's 'well pants' (bad), declare 'that's the badger' (right, that's what i was trying to say) or that my snazzy new t-shirt is 'gert-lush' (fantastic).

Wouldn't mean much to some people outside the county, let alone out the country! And that's just from one small area in my county. There's several other dialects too, all with their own slang conventions and trends.
gosh columbine-- so much of that is new to me apart from !PANTS" Wonder how that developed. fascinating

I have noticed on Tv where instead of "See you later" they just say "Laters" there must be masses that are new to me. thanks.
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09-25-2010, 02:55 AM

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Originally Posted by dogsbody70 View Post
I have noticed on Tv where instead of "See you later" they just say "Laters" there must be masses that are new to me. thanks.
For young people, "laters" just sounds 'cool' and 'in' and 'hype' with a "s" there. I think you might have heard people saying "anyways", as well. Same concept. There could be a logic behind its development, I dunno, but it's not what matters when people use it now.


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09-26-2010, 10:56 AM

There are some habits we have here in parts of UK such as Putting the word _LIKE- in-between many sentences-- I personally find it most irritating-- Also many people-- possibly even myself will also keep adding "YOU KNOW what I mean-- Over and over again-- it drives me mad.

Its all too easy to develop these bad habits isn't it.
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09-26-2010, 11:46 AM

I can't remember who said it, but someone once said that a never changing language is a dying language. I really like how English varies from generation to generation, from location to location, and social status to social status.

In my group of friends;

Welsh tends to say; That is lush
Young South Londoner says; That is Gangsta
Better educated folk might say; That is marvellous

...and so on!

Personally, I tend to struggle with certain dialects or how certain groups of people speak. English isn't my first language and I didn't learn it as an infant, so basically the English I learnt is what you get in books! I remember in high school, a lot of people thought I was posh for not talking a certain way. It took me years to get comfortable with saying things like "innit". Now I love speaking a certain way with certain people! For me, it adds to the richness of the English language.
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09-26-2010, 03:27 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dogsbody70 View Post
There are some habits we have here in parts of UK such as Putting the word _LIKE- in-between many sentences-- I personally find it most irritating-- Also many people-- possibly even myself will also keep adding "YOU KNOW what I mean-- Over and over again-- it drives me mad.

Its all too easy to develop these bad habits isn't it.
*laughs* this is great, I'm glad I'm not the only one who finds it irritating. That "like" habit was influenced from the Americans, wasn't it? My Canadian friend uses it a lot, so that could be it. Every youngster in my country, like, uses it, he he. Even those who are beginners to English are being influenced to a significant extent. I think "like" is a substitute/alternative for "erm" or "um", due to lack of something to say or a stall for time to think about the next thing to say. "you know what I mean" is sort of assertive and directive toward the recipient's subconsciousness, making it interpret your message as something obvious, right? At least, that's what I think it does/means.

One I like in particular:

"shut up!" = sarcastic exclamation, which is now used in a very normal tone, as if to say "i don't believe it!" with a "tell me more!" connotation.

Now, there's also the internet lingo that's used very often, even outside of the P.C.


@noodle hear, hear!!


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