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RobinMask (Offline)
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07-30-2011, 07:45 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dogsbody70 View Post
whatever you say. How about using your imagination Robin and not make a big deal by a stray comment of mine.
Forgive me, but when someone is trying to learn English it is a big deal. The slightest mistype or error can change a person's meaning immensely, and for a learner any misunderstanding can prove fatal, it's very hard to change a habit, if he gets used to using the wrong grammatical forms and spelling now . . . well, you can use your imagination to fill in the rest of that sentence

If you'd made a stray comment in any other thread, then that would be fair enough and I'd apologise for being pedantic, but when someone is learning a language we owe it to them to be as accurate as possible. For that reason I take offense at your tone somewhat, because I think that telling him he's making errors when he isn't will only serve to confuse him.

Over and out

Edit: I'd also add another user also said the same as I did, so it is rather unfair you would accuse only me of making a 'big deal'.

Last edited by RobinMask : 07-30-2011 at 07:48 PM.
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Supperman (Offline)
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07-31-2011, 03:54 AM

" Hang on a minute- won't be long" (correct)
meaning we want them to wait for a short time until we have finished what we are doing, So in that context we are asking them to wait a minute or two for us.
"Hang on, I want to look in this shop." expecting a friend to wait a minute while they look in the certain shop. (correct)

If I hang on to continue this thread, I would become a Master of English!. (wrong)

If I persevere with this thread, I will make a good progress.
(correct)

"Hang on in there" (correct)

" Hang on in there, don't give up, you can do it--" (correct)

"A lot of expensive demand notes have arrived me"
(wrong)
"A lot of expensive demand notes have arrived for me" (awkward)
"I have received a lot of expensive demand notes". (correct)

Pete: What's happened?
Suzie: Bob has fallen off a cliff and is hanging on by his fingers!
Pete: Hang on, Bob! Help is on it's way!

"Hold on to the dog's collar, he might bite me."


Mum: Hey, hurry up and get off the computer! >[

Me: Hang on, hang on! It's just printing! >P

Sue: Should I put the fish in now?

Anna: Hang on, let me read the recipe.

Let's go back to Bob. The dog bit him and he's now at the hospital.
Bob: Doctor, it hurts! Please can I have some pain relief?
Doctor: Just hang on, Bob, we must stop the bleeding first.

'hang on studying' (wrong)
hang on ---ing (wrong)

"Bob couldn't hold onto the cliff, and he fell."
"The Joker couldn't hold onto the ladder and he fell."
"Bill didn't hold onto his dog, and it bit someone."

"Suzie's a nice girl but she just can't hold onto a job."

She quits or gets fired a lot.
"I can't seem to hold onto my money at the moment- as fast as I make it, I spend it!"
"Bob didn't hold onto his wife, and now she's left him for Bill."


"I can't hold on anymore" means "I am about to break" "I want this to end" "I've had enough of this situation."

Bob: I just can't hold on anymore; I nearly died falling off a cliff, a dog bit me, I lost my job and my wife has left me for another man. I've tried to stay cheerful, but it's just too much- I wish my life was over!
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RealJames (Offline)
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07-31-2011, 04:42 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Supperman View Post
Thank you, dogsbody70, RobinMask and Columbine, for your detailed suggestion.

First, I have to apologize of my confusion between "hang on" and "hold on".
I confused completely, and thought the two idioms as the same thing.

I now realize that the two are different each other.

From now on, I will check it out and learn what was taught by all of you.

Thank you.
"Hold on" and "Hang on" each have several meanings.
The "wait" meaning is the same.

The different meanings need to be learned separately.

Superman I checked some of your sentences and posts in other threads and my quick recommendation to you is to make some flashcards of phrasal verbs.

Phrasal verbs are the source of a lot of confusion for most ESL learners.
How often and how well (transparently) someone can use them is a good sign of their level.


マンツーマン 英会話 神戸 三宮 リアライズ -James- This is my life and why I know things about Japan.
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dogsbody70 (Offline)
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07-31-2011, 10:13 AM

Hi James, I never even knew what Phrasal Verbs were until my friend told me.

It seems that we use them a great deal, and it must be very hard for others to learn them.

Maybe you can put some examples here for us?
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dogsbody70 (Offline)
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07-31-2011, 10:16 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobinMask View Post
Forgive me, but when someone is trying to learn English it is a big deal. The slightest mistype or error can change a person's meaning immensely, and for a learner any misunderstanding can prove fatal, it's very hard to change a habit, if he gets used to using the wrong grammatical forms and spelling now . . . well, you can use your imagination to fill in the rest of that sentence

If you'd made a stray comment in any other thread, then that would be fair enough and I'd apologise for being pedantic, but when someone is learning a language we owe it to them to be as accurate as possible. For that reason I take offense at your tone somewhat, because I think that telling him he's making errors when he isn't will only serve to confuse him.

Over and out

Edit: I'd also add another user also said the same as I did, so it is rather unfair you would accuse only me of making a 'big deal'.


"Making a mountain out of a mole hill" Another idiom.
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dogsbody70 (Offline)
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07-31-2011, 10:18 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Supperman View Post
Thank you, dogsbody70, RobinMask and Columbine, for your detailed suggestion.

First, I have to apologize of my confusion between "hang on" and "hold on".
I confused completely, and thought the two idioms as the same thing.

I now realize that the two are different each other.

From now on, I will check it out and learn what was taught by all of you.

Thank you.
apparently I have committed a crime by suggesting you learn about INTO.


Into/In To; Onto/In To. This gives a few examples on both In TO INTO

and On TO ONTO.

Last edited by dogsbody70 : 07-31-2011 at 10:33 AM.
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RealJames (Offline)
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07-31-2011, 12:14 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dogsbody70 View Post
Hi James, I never even knew what Phrasal Verbs were until my friend told me.

It seems that we use them a great deal, and it must be very hard for others to learn them.

Maybe you can put some examples here for us?
Phrasal Verbs List
List of English phrasal verbs
A-Z List of Phrasal Verbs - UsingEnglish.com
Phrasal Verbs List | EFLnet

there are thousands of sites listing them, and they're all incomplete lol
what's worse is that some of them are lacking some definitions based on where the object is placed


マンツーマン 英会話 神戸 三宮 リアライズ -James- This is my life and why I know things about Japan.
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Supperman (Offline)
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07-31-2011, 12:17 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by RealJames View Post
Superman I checked some of your sentences and posts in other threads and my quick recommendation to you is to make some flashcards of phrasal verbs.
Thank you RealJapmes, for your advice.
Yes, I thought "idioms" include "phrasal verbs".

BTW, I have two questions regarding to your advice.
First, which do you mean by "flashcard"?
the high-tech, IPOD software,
or
the classical tag-shaped sheets of paper which is combined by a metal ring, which we call "単語カード"?

Which do you recommend? or
Which do your students seem to use in Japan?

And the second question is;
are there any difference among, 'verb phrase', 'verbal phrase' and 'phrasal verb'?
Are they identical and interchangeable?
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Supperman (Offline)
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07-31-2011, 12:25 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dogsbody70 View Post

Into/In To; Onto/In To. This gives a few examples on both In TO INTO
and On TO ONTO.
Thank you.
The site is quite interesting!
And of course, educational!

Last edited by Supperman : 07-31-2011 at 12:35 PM.
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RealJames (Offline)
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07-31-2011, 12:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Supperman View Post
Thank you RealJapmes, for your advice.
Yes, I thought "idioms" include "phrasal verbs".

BTW, I have two questions regarding to your advice.
First, which do you mean by "flashcard"?
the high-tech, IPOD software,
or
the classical tag-shaped sheets of paper which is combined by a metal ring, which we call "単語カード"?

Which do you recommend? or
Which do your students seem to use in Japan?

And the second question is;
are there any difference among, 'verb phrase', 'verbal phrase' and 'phrasal verb'?
Are they identical and interchangeable?
A few of my students use the iPod software, many use the actual 単語カード, I feel the real one is better because it's more difficult to forget about it since you can put it on your desk as a visual reminder.
The important thing is that you regularly review the English you aren't familiar with or have forgotten.
I also recommend that while you are going through the flashcards you write example sentences from your imagination using the words which you couldn't remember immediately.

verb phrase and verbal phrase are the same
Most verbal phrases are also phrasal verbs
This is only a verbal phrase; "My friend is pushing the envelope." (it means going close to the limit)
Phrasal verbs and Verbal Phrases are basically all idiomatic.

I suggested you focus on Phrasal Verbs because in everyday speech we use them much more than idiomatic verbal phrases or simple idioms.
We (native speakers) also tend to speak without idioms and idiomatic verbal phrases when speaking to non-native speakers but we tend to keep the phrasal verbs, sometimes even use them more often.

I want to show one example of why phrasal verbs can be very difficult;
get over with it -> forget about it, continue with life and stop thinking of it
"I want to get over with thinking of my ex-girlfriend, but she was so sexy it's difficult!"
get it over with -> finally do something which is difficult or postponed
"I've been really worried about my JLPT next Sunday but I can't wait to get it over with!"


マンツーマン 英会話 神戸 三宮 リアライズ -James- This is my life and why I know things about Japan.

Last edited by RealJames : 07-31-2011 at 12:39 PM.
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