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-   -   Why does Japanese culture attracts foreign weirdoes? (http://www.japanforum.com/forum/general-discussion/22591-why-does-japanese-culture-attracts-foreign-weirdoes.html)

Seanus 08-15-2009 01:10 PM

That's true enough, Ronin. America is a little different in the eyes of Private International Family Law (PIFL). You can be Taiwanese-American, for example, but part American just doesn't wash. We are all part African if you were to accept otherwise.

Ryzorian 08-16-2009 06:11 PM

Personally, I don't think "American" is even really a racial type of thing. I allways felt anyone on the planet could be "American", it's more a way of belief, a way of liveing, a particular view of how the world should be.

One of the most Highly decorated army units in American history is the 404 all Japanese brigade that fought in Germany dureing WW2. They exemplified what being an "American" is all about.

I think partly that's what causes such a fear amoung so many nations reguarding "American's", since it's a belief system more than a "race", it can be spread pretty easily amoung other cultures. Some countries fear being "Americanized" will destroy thier own culture history. Course, many nations are dictatorships, so that may not be a bad thing anyway.

Ronin4hire 08-17-2009 12:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryzorian (Post 761853)
Personally, I don't think "American" is even really a racial type of thing. I allways felt anyone on the planet could be "American", it's more a way of belief, a way of liveing, a particular view of how the world should be.

One of the most Highly decorated army units in American history is the 404 all Japanese brigade that fought in Germany dureing WW2. They exemplified what being an "American" is all about.

I think partly that's what causes such a fear amoung so many nations reguarding "American's", since it's a belief system more than a "race", it can be spread pretty easily amoung other cultures. Some countries fear being "Americanized" will destroy thier own culture history. Course, many nations are dictatorships, so that may not be a bad thing anyway.

Ummm... no one said America was a race. It's a nationality of course.

Ryzorian 08-17-2009 06:29 PM

I don't even think it's a "nationality" persay, not in the sense of Italians or Scottish or Japanese. Wich are almost used as "racial/tribal" affiliations. Sure it is a type of cultural identity, but I think anyone across the globe can become the "American" identity more easily than more nationalistic cultures. I tend to think of "Americanism" as a belief system, almost like a relgion as apposed to a nation with predescribed borders.

For instance, folks of non asian features can try to adapt themselves to Japanese culture but may never truely be seen as "Japanese". While it can be problematic at times in American culture as well, anyone, reguardless of race or nationality can become "American." That's part of the core aspect of chaseing the "American" dream.

I think many of the problems that take place in the states between folks are hold overs from the countries of orgin of those folks preventing them from realizeing what being "American" truely means. I.E. old grudges between Irish and British and the like that are brought here from the old country.

That's my reasoning anyhow.

MasaruShin 08-17-2009 07:14 PM

There are many different reasons one may be interested in another's culture. I think it is only natural for humans to be interested in other ethnic and racial cultures. Although the Japanese do tend to draw it's share of weirdos, they also draw really interesting individuals in the same right. Nothing's wrong with weird people so long as they are not disturbing the indigenous qualities of the natives' lifestyles. We're all different, it should hold no bearing to judging another person with negative impulse.

Ronin4hire 08-18-2009 05:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryzorian (Post 762302)
I don't even think it's a "nationality" persay, not in the sense of Italians or Scottish or Japanese. Wich are almost used as "racial/tribal" affiliations. Sure it is a type of cultural identity, but I think anyone across the globe can become the "American" identity more easily than more nationalistic cultures. I tend to think of "Americanism" as a belief system, almost like a relgion as apposed to a nation with predescribed borders.

For instance, folks of non asian features can try to adapt themselves to Japanese culture but may never truely be seen as "Japanese". While it can be problematic at times in American culture as well, anyone, reguardless of race or nationality can become "American." That's part of the core aspect of chaseing the "American" dream.

I think many of the problems that take place in the states between folks are hold overs from the countries of orgin of those folks preventing them from realizeing what being "American" truely means. I.E. old grudges between Irish and British and the like that are brought here from the old country.

That's my reasoning anyhow.

I know what you're saying... and you are kind of on the right track with your observations and I give you kudos for that. :)

But you do have the definition of nation and nationality wrong.

A nation is simply defined as a group of people who share a common identity (not necessarily through race) and as a group share some sort of political ambition (which can range from independence to civil rights to expansion)

Furthermore America is one of the most nationalistic countries in the world if you consider the degree to which America seeks to expand it's influence and consolidate identity amongst it's citizens (concerning the latter, it is more aggressively nationalistic than many nations which are based on ethnicity).

Ryzorian 08-18-2009 10:31 PM

I understand where your comeing from, perhaps that nationalistic streak America tends to have is partly because of it's dicotomy of different cultures blended into one. In other words, it's trying to go all "Borg" like and absorb all other cultures into itself.

randomdiscussionblog 08-19-2009 01:14 AM

Perhaps it is because the Japanese culture stands out as the most original of all.

Megabyte117 08-19-2009 04:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by randomdiscussionblog (Post 762752)
Perhaps it is because the Japanese culture stands out as the most original of all.

What makes the Japanese culture more original than any other? :confused:

joeyj 08-19-2009 04:39 AM

A couple of my Japanese roommates said that they have a problem making "normal" friends here and that they are only able to make friends with weird americans lol


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