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08-19-2009, 12:58 PM

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Originally Posted by Ryzorian View Post
I think many of the problems that take place in the states between folks are hold overs from the countries of orgin of those folks preventing them from realizeing what being "American" truely means. I.E. old grudges between Irish and British and the like that are brought here from the old country.

That's my reasoning anyhow.
Good points, there, but especially this last one.

There is definitely a perpetual conflict within the U.S. between the preservation of indigenous identity and assimilation "for the greater good". The two do not seem able to peacefully co-exist on a large scale.

In this country an individual may find ways to preserve his inherited identity on a personal level(Celtic, Arabian, Latin, Asian etc.), but much is lost because one person alone is not enough to preserve a cultural identity. Unfortunately the forced emphasis on a specific culture, to the detriment of the general population breeds concept and resentment. Example: the expense of signs in multiple languages in addition to English because no national language has ever been put into law.

Assimilation is beneficial in maintaining a workable flow of activity and communication, along with many other benefits that come from the classic strength in numbers concept. However, all too often the result is the plowing under of contrasting, unique and beneficial cultural differences. Example: Enactment of city zoning for health reason that in effect outlawed the practice of a specific, recognized religion (this is in the courts in my hometown right now!).

Neither of these is not evil per se, but the ill-informed or careless imbalance of the two is highly destructive. And to my way of thinking, the United States is the grand experiment attempting to tackle this challenge. We seem to sit on a teeter-totter that much too frequently sees too much emphasis on one side or the other.

Perhaps it is that unconcious struggle to offset the weight of assimilation that impels Americans to seek out other cultures with as much contrast to their own as possible. Perhap this is the gensis of the Otaku, Japanophile, or what ever other descriptive term you care to use to describe Americans obsessed with Japanese culture.


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Seanus (Offline)
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08-19-2009, 11:05 PM

Some Japanese tv shows exemplify the concept of 'weird'. It's easy to be anonymous in Japanese society as they invariably don't talk to you, preferring to get on with their daily grind. The eccentric may not be an outcast in Japan. They cater for many tastes.
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08-19-2009, 11:54 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sitron View Post
I just started learning Japanese and frequent Japanese boards like /jp/ on 4chan.org - what I've noticed is that unlike France or Germany, Japanese culture attract really, really weird foreign people.
Don't mistake me, I love Japanese culture. But all the pedophiles, cartoon nerds, lonely bitter misogynists, racists that think that the Japanese are some kind of super-race, and freaks who want to become Japanese almost made me learn Spanish instead.

Why do you think that Japanese culture attracts the attention of so many social retards, nerds, pedophiles, NEETs, and freaks in general?
Well why is person weird if he/she wants to learn about other culture?
For example I am so impressed with it, it's amazyng for me how some of japanese people menaged to save culture and traditional way of life from foreign influence. they recpect each other,in my country people don't know whar respect means...I love anime cartoons,I love everthing about it and I don't think that I am freak because of that.
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08-20-2009, 12:19 AM

uwaa.. no way in hell do i have the time to read through 17 pages of this >.>'''

but anyway~ xD

the japanese were just more appealing to me as a child because of all their manga and anime and stuff >.>''
It was just much more interesting than anything any other culture/country/society could offer~
and as i got deeper and deeper into the anime~ i just started to appreciate the different culture a bit because it was so different from what i was accostumed too >.>'
and yea~ that lead from one thing to another~
(and somewhere along that way i landed in this forum xD)



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08-20-2009, 02:03 AM

I have this theory, the Japanese culture as a whole seems to be obcessive compulsive (always trying for perfection, my wife is like this too). I think the strange foreigners see this as a intense attempt to do all things perfectly and almost see this as a religious or spiritual pursuit. They hope to reach this level of "spirituallity". It just makes me crazy.


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Ryzorian (Offline)
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08-21-2009, 11:47 PM

Heh, I'm American, so I allready think I'm perfect.
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08-22-2009, 12:19 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by TalnSG View Post
Good points, there, but especially this last one.

There is definitely a perpetual conflict within the U.S. between the preservation of indigenous identity and assimilation "for the greater good". The two do not seem able to peacefully co-exist on a large scale.

In this country an individual may find ways to preserve his inherited identity on a personal level(Celtic, Arabian, Latin, Asian etc.), but much is lost because one person alone is not enough to preserve a cultural identity. Unfortunately the forced emphasis on a specific culture, to the detriment of the general population breeds concept and resentment. Example: the expense of signs in multiple languages in addition to English because no national language has ever been put into law.

Assimilation is beneficial in maintaining a workable flow of activity and communication, along with many other benefits that come from the classic strength in numbers concept. However, all too often the result is the plowing under of contrasting, unique and beneficial cultural differences. Example: Enactment of city zoning for health reason that in effect outlawed the practice of a specific, recognized religion (this is in the courts in my hometown right now!).

Neither of these is not evil per se, but the ill-informed or careless imbalance of the two is highly destructive. And to my way of thinking, the United States is the grand experiment attempting to tackle this challenge. We seem to sit on a teeter-totter that much too frequently sees too much emphasis on one side or the other.

Perhaps it is that unconcious struggle to offset the weight of assimilation that impels Americans to seek out other cultures with as much contrast to their own as possible. Perhap this is the gensis of the Otaku, Japanophile, or what ever other descriptive term you care to use to describe Americans obsessed with Japanese culture.
Interesting and well thought out insight.

Personally, in principle at least... I think France are the ones on the right track when it comes to assimilation. Their aggressive brand of secularism and their take on modern liberalism is the most rational in my opinion.

American secularism and ideas of multi-culturalism are too passive in my opinion. It's created deep fractures in American society and while it's certainly not perfect in France. From what I understand, the nationalist discourse is not as controversial and polarizing in France as it is in the US.

Last edited by Ronin4hire : 08-22-2009 at 12:21 AM.
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Ryzorian (Offline)
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08-23-2009, 12:57 AM

Well, France is haveing trouble assimulateing Muslim groups.
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08-23-2009, 11:34 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryzorian View Post
Well, France is haveing trouble assimulateing Muslim groups.
Meh... Who isn't...

At least the French have made a stand though regarding certain things. I'd rather live in a country which treated citizenship as a privilege (France) rather than a right (America).
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08-23-2009, 12:42 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by bELyVIS View Post
I have this theory, the Japanese culture as a whole seems to be obcessive compulsive (always trying for perfection, my wife is like this too). .
I can definitely imagine what you are going through as mine was the same.


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