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filip1 08-04-2010 09:27 AM

Antique Japanese book of paintings
 
I am trying for some time to find a answers on some questions about unique Japan/Chinese notebook of original paintings, which I acquired few years ago. I will be very thankful if any of you could try to tell me something more about it, or, if you are not familiar with it, to guide some expert who will be able to tell me more.

However, what I have is this: A very large scrapbook full of original drawings, sketches and paintings, done by unknown Japanese artist in the period probably before the 2nd world war. Some people who are familiar with Japanese language told me that this looks as a artist's map/scrapbook made by some Japanese artist in which he are explaining techniques of Chinese art. In the scrapbook are more than 150 original drawings, paintings and writings. Maybe all that is done by some painter famous in Japan, and need to be researched. Some of the paintings in the scrapbook are stamped with a red stamp which is known to be used by Japanese painters. I enlarged that stamp on one of the photos, so maybe if someone who is familiar with it, could help me to determine the name of the artist.

I already uploaded some photos of the paintings from the book on this link here (you can enlarge all of them if you click on of it), but if some of you will need more photos, I will make it. I would just like to mention again that all drawings and paintings in the scrapbook are original, done by hand, and than glued on the pages.

I also found one old postcard tucked in the scrapbook, and you can also find a photo of it on the link here. Maybe it give to us answer on some questions.

So, here is the link on the all photos already uploaded:

link ----> japan pictures by martimisterija - Photobucket

And here is some of the samples:














Columbine 08-04-2010 10:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by filip1 (Post 822617)
I am trying for some time to find a answers on some questions about unique Japan/Chinese notebook of original paintings, which I acquired few years ago. I will be very thankful if any of you could try to tell me something more about it, or, if you are not familiar with it, to guide some expert who will be able to tell me more.

Trying to hunt down the name of an individual artist is usually impossible; true they have their own individual hanko, but everyone and their dog who paints makes their own and there's not really a database for it.

On the other hand, that postcard could be an amazing clue; you know at some point, this collection was connected to a Dr. Kawamura at Harvard U in the Zoology department in 1959. Why not make enquiries? There's also two other names on the postcard; Gaadoruudo (a japonification of a non-japanese name) and 青木 (Aoki). The Aoki could well be the same chap whose address label you have on the sketch of the people.

The address on the right reads hamakura, two hiragana possibly kara (from), koe-ya shi, Chayanomachi, 823 (haninosan). It's a location in West Osaka.


The address on the left is
Kyotoshi, ukyouku, yamadaue 11. Roughly; Kyoto city, right city ward, up-yamada, 11. It's up in N.W Kyoto. It ends with what I thought was Kawamura Tamiji, relating back to the Dr. Kawamura at the top, but actually, i'm kind of confused because it looks like the same characters are printed on the spine of the postcard, except what I thought is 実 in the handwriting is a character my dictionary doesn't recognize. And odd to see the name of the recipient printed ON the postcard, right? The other pair on the spine is keikai, i think, which mean 'warning' or 'vigilance', though I might be reading that wrong, still weird to see on a postcard.

So, makes me wonder what's on the front of the postcard.

I can't read much of the rest, cursive is still really difficult for me, but the 4th picture in the album is a temple gate, and I'd say if the artist was drawing pre-war, then this has changed hands a few times, or collated post-war because the blue writing on it looks like biro and that wasn't around until 1950. From the style of the painting, I'd say the artist is most likely Japanese, not Chinese.

Thanks for sharing, it's really interesting!

filip1 08-04-2010 11:28 AM

Dear Columbine,

thank you so much in helping me to solve this mystery! It seems that on the postal cancel is another year than 1959 (19-16?), and I think that a year 1959 is when someone added additional note (maybe some previous researcher from that time?). However, I am not sure that it is a actual year on the postal cancel, but it looks like it is. And all this drawings and paintings in the book looks to be made a much before 1959 (probably in the first half of the 20th century).

I made a scan of the front page of the postcard for you, there is also some interesting notations...

Maybe, but only maybe, if you look that on the first post stamp was glued another... and address written in English is also added later... Maybe someone 33 years later send again the same postcard... He (or she) just glued actual post stamp over the used, added a new address on English, and resent again the same postcard???


Columbine 08-04-2010 11:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by filip1 (Post 822632)
Dear Columbine,

thank you so much in helping me to solve this mystery! It seems that on the postal cancel is another year than 1959 (19-16?), and I think that a year 1959 is when someone added additional note (maybe some previous researcher from that time?). However, I am not sure that it is a actual year on the postal cancel, but it looks like it is. And all this drawings and paintings in the book looks to be made a much before 1959 (probably in the first half of the 20th century).

I made a scan of the front page of the postcard for you, there is also some interesting notations...

Maybe, but only maybe, if you look that on the first post stamp was glued another... and address written in English is also added later... Maybe someone 33 years later send again the same postcard... He (or she) just glued actual post stamp over the used, added a new address on English, and resent again the same postcard???

Ah, interesting, that clears up a lot! So our Dr. Kawamura was an artist himself. This would explain why his name is on the card, 'warning' would likely be the title of the piece.
The other date looks like it's on a Japanese post-mark, so i think it's showa 16 (1941). I don't think it's older, that's not a 9 in my book, and definitely not a 5, so that rules out the taisho era, and because of the printing, but your right, it looks like it's been through the system a couple of times. Odd though, as it seems like it was sent from Osaka to Kyoto (i presume), then wound up in America, posted to the same Kyoto address, and wound up in America again. Or, the english address might have been penned by this gaadoruudo character, then shoved into the collection and then it ended up in America. hmm~

Not sure what the College is; it could be the Kyoto City University of Arts, which would match as it's only about a 10 min drive from Kawamura's address in Yamadaue. The Uni has an english web-page, so I'd recommend contacting them with your story, and asking if they know anything.

How did you come by the book, out of interest?

EDIT: Haha, Ok, ignore most of this! SashiM is a native speaker and knows far better than me! So the artist of the sketch book was Aoki do you think?

Sashimister 08-04-2010 11:59 AM

Just a few things that I can tell without using almost no speculation:

1. The signature stamp matches the first name of the receiver of the postcard. His name is Aoki Minoru (family name first).

2. The sender of the postcard, Kawamura Tamiji, would have to be this person.
川村多実二 - Wikipedia
This person lived 1883-1964 and he was president of Kyoto City ollege of Fine Arts 1957-63.

3. The number 16 on the cancellation stamp is not the year, but the date in the Japanese word order. It's April 16. The year is hard to read. One can see "4" clearly but it looks like there was another numeral before it. Whatever this number for the year is, it would be the Japanese year, not the last two digits of a Western year.

If it is 34 of the Showa Era, then it actually matches 1959.

filip1 08-04-2010 12:21 PM

Thank you so much for the help, Columbine and Sashimister. On one of the pages is glued a label with name and address of Minoru Aoki. So, maybe is could be a actual painter, but it is also possible that he glued that just to show that he is owner of the book (some kind of Ex Libris).

Is it possible to find out what is written in the rest of the postcard? I can upload a photo in higer resolution, if it could be helpful...

Columbine, I got this book from a lady from USA, who found it in her basement, where it stayed for decades, and she didn't know anything about its origin. She also didn't know anything about people who lived in that building before her.


filip1 08-04-2010 12:29 PM

there is some books in the yale library written by Aoki Minoru...

link ----> Author Search Results

Columbine 08-04-2010 12:44 PM

I think what SM-san was saying was that the red hanko stamp read "Minoru".

filip1 08-04-2010 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Columbine (Post 822642)
I think what SM-san was saying was that the red hanko stamp read "Minoru".

yes, it seems that Minoru Aoki made all this paintings in the book.

SM-san, thank you very much for that information!

Sashimister 08-04-2010 01:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by filip1 (Post 822637)
 
Is it possible to find out what is written in the rest of the postcard? I can upload a photo in higer resolution, if it could be helpful...

It is possible but unfortunately the content would not help you much with your investigation.

"Thank you very much for your letter. My school is on the spring break so I haven't been going to work everyday, thus the delay in replying. I am happy to hear that your works, as well as those by the Nanko School fellows, will be at display at the (unusual last name I couldn't read) residence. On the 25th and 26th, I will be at the Yourou Falls in Mino, conducting some research for the Kansai Natural Science Society, of which I'm the president. I'll be in charge of the birds there. However, I will do my best to visit you on one of those two days. I will be looking forward to seeing the works of Mr. Honda and my friend Sadayoshi Nishiuch as well. Sincerely."


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