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08-10-2009, 05:17 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ozkai View Post
This was a debatic topic when my son was born.

I think Japanese schooling and society is good for kids under the age of 12 as it teaches discipne, right from wrong, and respect.

After 12, I feel that Japan is not good due to the lack of people skills within the country, being a "together" group society.

What do you think, experiences, etc.?

**Please note, this is in the parenting thread**
I think it's the parents job to teach all things.

I don't like the sound of being a "together" society, anyway.

Even so, there's no way i'd rely on another person or organization t teach my child the things necessary for life. The country I live in is regardless.


The eternal Saint is calling, through the ages she has told. The ages have not listened; the will of faith has grown old…

For forever she will wander, for forever she withholds; the Demon King is on his way, you’d best not be learned untold…
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08-10-2009, 05:19 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MMM View Post
What does "people skills" mean?
Think Otaku...


The eternal Saint is calling, through the ages she has told. The ages have not listened; the will of faith has grown old…

For forever she will wander, for forever she withholds; the Demon King is on his way, you’d best not be learned untold…
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noodle (Offline)
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01-02-2010, 07:22 PM

A quick, probably random question; where do people get the idea that Japanese Secondary education is the toughest in the world?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenchu View Post
I think it's the parents job to teach all things.

I don't like the sound of being a "together" society, anyway.

Even so, there's no way i'd rely on another person or organization t teach my child the things necessary for life. The country I live in is regardless.
Really? Home schooled kids usually do get better grades on average, but so do geeks in normal schools. Both of these tend to have difficulties in later life, in the "real world".
Surely it'd be better to let your child get an education at an organisation whilst keeping track of what he's learning?

Last edited by noodle : 01-02-2010 at 07:26 PM.
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Antu (Offline)
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What...? - 02-04-2010, 04:21 PM

What...?
What.......................?
Quote:
Originally Posted by MMM View Post
What does "people skills" mean?

Almost 99% of the residents of Japan are Japanese.

90% of the non-Japanese are Chinese and Korean.

So if you are saying that Japanese are not officially taught to deal with 0.1% of the population of Japan of non-Asian foreigners, you are probably right. Though if I were making a budget and were asked what the priorities were, that issue would stand at a 0.1% priority.

Where I live the population is about 20% Hispanic, and I can't say that American students are taught "people skills" either.
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Antu (Offline)
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skilled means prepared - 02-04-2010, 04:23 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenchu View Post
Think Otaku...
or educated in something to help them live of.
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xzilireight (Offline)
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02-23-2010, 09:01 PM

School in Japan can be very traumatizing.

As someone who spent 10 years as the only full gainjin in her entire school, I DO NOT recommend it.
Elementary school was ok. I learned the language, reading, writing, speaking, and I became very fluent in the culture. But I experienced a lot of bullying, and did not have a lot of friends because I was the tallest person in my class and I wasn't "part of the group."
Once I moved on the Junior High, things got worse. My Mom sought out the most competitive schools in the area for me, and I couldn't keep up. The ijime continued, and by the time I left Japan to attend High School in the U.S., I was left with a huge identity crisis.

It's taken me years to get over my time in Japan. It was very hard as a child. I didn't choose to go to Japan, and I was left dealing with the consequences of my Mother's decisions.

Also, the Japanese community will make a LOT of sacrifices for your child. The don't like giving "special treatment," but they will give it to you anyway. That can leave you deeply indebted, your child will feel different from the other kids, and it can cause a lot of strained relationships.

All in all, it's a lot to deal with, and I don't think it's a very good idea.
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sarasi (Offline)
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02-24-2010, 01:28 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ozkai View Post
If you lived in Japan long enough you may understand!

This was a while ago, but ozkai, I have lived in Japan for 12 years and am married to a Japanese guy, who in spite of having done all his schooling in Japan, has great people skills. I don't fully understand what you mean, so please enlighten me.

Last edited by sarasi : 02-24-2010 at 01:32 AM.
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