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evanny (Offline)
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romanji - 09-25-2010, 08:57 PM

ive been studying japanese for some 3 weeks now. i know hiragana and half of katakana and some basic expressions. so..in order to practice writing faster and the overall language i would really appreciate if someone could drop me a link with simple stories in a CORRECT romanji? for me to to rewrite the whole thing in hiragana for practice.

i could use some stories in hiragana also. to practice reading and the words themselves.

well. thanks to anyone who responds
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Columbine (Offline)
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09-25-2010, 09:39 PM

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Originally Posted by evanny View Post
ive been studying japanese for some 3 weeks now. i know hiragana and half of katakana and some basic expressions. so..in order to practice writing faster and the overall language i would really appreciate if someone could drop me a link with simple stories in a CORRECT romanji? for me to to rewrite the whole thing in hiragana for practice.

i could use some stories in hiragana also. to practice reading and the words themselves.

well. thanks to anyone who responds
Well... you could, but honestly, blindly copying a story from romaji to hiragana isn't going to teach you much. besides, ~which~ 'correct' romaji. There's numerous systems, all of them supposedly 'correct'. Either way, you'll still only be thinking of hiragana in single units. Better to learn words and then write them in hiragana/katakana as you do so. You'll understand how they construct pronunciation better, and work together to make a word. You'll also then have a useful vocab word you can associate the hiragana with, like "ok, i need to write this new word 'meshi'... so i'll need the hiragana for 'me'...oh, it's like 'me' in 'megane'. And then 'shi' just like in 'shibuya'. Easy!" rather than "I need to write this new word 'meshi'....now is that the squirly one with the curl, or the squirly one with the loop?"

If you do go down this route, study about 8-10 words at a time, and in this order for each new word (it's the most efficient method, really):
Look at the meaning in English.
Study the pronunciation (IE LISTEN to the word being said. repeat it a few times until you get it right)
THEN look at the writing. Seriously, DON'T look at the text first, it will throw you off how to say the word correctly as you'll automatically read it from an English Language perspective.
Finally, check the meaning again.

This will benefit your learning 100x more than just copying out sounds to make words and grammar you don't fully understand yet.
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09-25-2010, 11:26 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by evanny View Post
ive been studying japanese for some 3 weeks now. i know hiragana and half of katakana and some basic expressions. so..in order to practice writing faster and the overall language i would really appreciate if someone could drop me a link with simple stories in a CORRECT romanji? for me to to rewrite the whole thing in hiragana for practice.

i could use some stories in hiragana also. to practice reading and the words themselves.

well. thanks to anyone who responds
Why would you want to learn the skill of converting romaji to kana? You will literally never use it in real life.

It's like learning how to write English like this: アイ・アム・エイ・スチューデント・オブ・ジャパニー ズ ("ai amu ei sutyuudento obu japaniizu").
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steven (Offline)
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09-26-2010, 01:17 AM

If you're planning on coming to Japan, knowing how to read romaji is definitely important. City names, intersection names, and some rail stuff are sometimes just written in kanji and romaji (no hiragana or katakana). I think Japanese people will agree at least with this-- if you are in a place you are not really familiar with, that romaji will help you read the kanji. This is because there are multiple ways to read kanji... you'll know it's gonna be one or the other (and occasionally one more or so), but the romaji makes it final. At least that's what I've been told by some Japanese folks.

Other than that though, like everyone else is saying it's not something you wanna go out of your way to study.

" You'll understand how they construct pronunciation better, and work together to make a word."
I hate to disagree, but I'm not so sure that just studying hiragana alone is going to help with pronunciation. I've seen plenty of people who study hiragana and katakana and have absolutely terrible pronunciation. I think it would help to study writing/reading hiragana in conjunction with the sounds they make. Even still though, you don't quite get the whole picture as there are many cases when things aren't pronounced exactly how hiragana says they should be. Also, hiragana doesn't express intonation. While a Japanese who is just learning to read hiragana reading a word (in context) can probably say the right intonation, a person learning Japanese as a second language would struggle because it's not a language they've been exposed to for 4 years or so of their life.

A good example would be がっこう vs ちゅうがっこう. You don't wanna say the が in ちゅうがっこう as you'd say it in がっこう. You wanna soften it up-- a pronunciation dictionary I've seen (and I've only seen a one) writes it as a か with a maru instead of a ten-ten. Another example is おはようございます. As English speakers, we are all tempted to apply some of our pronunciation rules to that word, thus making ご or ざ (or both) strong "syllables" (technically moras in this case or something like that). I think the correct way to pronounce that is to have the pitch of the お be lower than the rest, and that's pretty much it. However, most people don't say it that clearly- they'll just say something like あざーす (or any of the variations that exist). At any rate, I don't think looking at it too technically like this at the start is gonna do much good. I do think, however, that listening to correctly pronounced Japanese while studying hiragana/katakana will help a lot (and the learner will probably pick up on some of the details I just covered naturally).

But yea, if you listen while studying Japanese words in hiragana, you will be way ahead of the person who is dealing with romaji. I also think that romaji, being written with the alphabet, makes it that much more tempting to really mispronounce words (or pronounce them as an English speaker would be inclined to do).

As far as "correct" romaji goes, I think hepburn is the closest to that. There are some styles where you could write し as "si", but that doesn't really get an English speaker anywhere close to correct pronunciation.
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09-26-2010, 02:16 AM

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If you're planning on coming to Japan, knowing how to read romaji is definitely important.
I don't think there's anyone who speaks English who cannot natively read romaji.

But doing a romaji to kana transliteration is pointless. It's an absolute waste of time. That is something that is absolutely not a skill that aids in speaking Japanese.
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evanny (Offline)
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09-26-2010, 06:00 AM

o my god people. i want to convert romanji to hirigana simply to train my writing speed. i am still writing slowly because i have to think of what im writing. so that romanji part is only for that.....and would be nice to have some hirigana text for simply reading..

and yes yes...thanks for everyones tips, however i already speak 3 languages. i think ill manage to find ways best suited for me to learn the 4th one.
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09-26-2010, 02:09 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by evanny View Post
o my god people. i want to convert romanji to hirigana simply to train my writing speed. i am still writing slowly because i have to think of what im writing. so that romanji part is only for that.....and would be nice to have some hirigana text for simply reading..

and yes yes...thanks for everyones tips, however i already speak 3 languages. i think ill manage to find ways best suited for me to learn the 4th one.
So instead of converting romaji to hiragana, just say the Japanese sounds out loud and try to write them quickly! You'll be able to practice your listening at the same time for even more benefits!

Also, out of curiosity, which are the two non-English languages you speak.

Also, it's romaji (no "n") and hiragana (only one "i").
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steven (Offline)
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09-26-2010, 02:41 PM

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Originally Posted by KyleGoetz View Post
I don't think there's anyone who speaks English who cannot natively read romaji.

But doing a romaji to kana transliteration is pointless. It's an absolute waste of time. That is something that is absolutely not a skill that aids in speaking Japanese.
Well let's just say that you'd be able to look at a word and recognize it if you saw it again. On the other hand, if you read a word like "Udon" as a native English speaker, you'll probably say the "on" part of it like "turn the lights on" which may or may not be understood by a Japanese person. "Onsen" is the same way. The word "Karaoke" is a prime example of this phenomenon. Have you tried saying that the English way to a Japanese person? Have you seen a native English speaker hear that word in Japanese for the first time? That's what I meant. Sorry for the confusion.

Evanny, good luck with Japanese. I believe you probably have a great advantage having learned multiple languages before coming to tackle Japanese. However, if your langauges are all European, there might be some surprises awaiting for you in Japanese. If you feel that copying romaji into hiragana or katakana will help you then go ahead and do it. While Kyle and I have some different opinions on how to learn Japanese, I totally agree with him in that copying romaji into hiragana/katakana will take time that would be better spent doing something else (like pronouncing what you write or listening to the kana as you write).
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evanny (Offline)
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09-30-2010, 01:19 PM

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Originally Posted by KyleGoetz View Post
So instead of converting romaji to hiragana, just say the Japanese sounds out loud and try to write them quickly! You'll be able to practice your listening at the same time for even more benefits!

Also, out of curiosity, which are the two non-English languages you speak.

Also, it's romaji (no "n") and hiragana (only one "i").
my native is latvian. second is english, third russian.
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11-01-2010, 05:35 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by evanny View Post
ive been studying japanese for some 3 weeks now. i know hiragana and half of katakana and some basic expressions. so..in order to practice writing faster and the overall language i would really appreciate if someone could drop me a link with simple stories in a CORRECT romanji? for me to to rewrite the whole thing in hiragana for practice.

i could use some stories in hiragana also. to practice reading and the words themselves.

well. thanks to anyone who responds

Hi, IDK if you found some sites. But I think learning to read and write in hiragana/katakana is a very good goal. Japanese kana is a challenge in itself, so ganbatte ne! I like this site because it helps me practice reading kana...it's great because it's in Furigana.

--http://life.ou.edu/stories/-- (remove the lines at both ends "--")

I also reccomend subscribing to the Hiragana times You can get it at jbox.com

I hope it helps!
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