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Question Schooling for over 12 year Old's in Japan. Good or lacking something? - 05-15-2009, 03:08 AM

This was a debatic topic when my son was born.

I think Japanese schooling and society is good for kids under the age of 12 as it teaches discipne, right from wrong, and respect.

After 12, I feel that Japan is not good due to the lack of people skills within the country, being a "together" group society.

What do you think, experiences, etc.?

**Please note, this is in the parenting thread**


Cheers - Oz
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05-28-2009, 12:19 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ozkai View Post
This was a debatic topic when my son was born.

I think Japanese schooling and society is good for kids under the age of 12 as it teaches discipne, right from wrong, and respect.

After 12, I feel that Japan is not good due to the lack of people skills within the country, being a "together" group society.

What do you think, experiences, etc.?

**Please note, this is in the parenting thread**
It's good for securing a second FLUENT language for sure and amazing at discipline that your kid will have asian core values taught to him inside and out and this will help with...overseas exams. I agree with you on that

But Japan has the hardest school exam in high school right? That's one heck of an achievement. But you don't have to move to a western country to give him that sort of education, about different people. There's always the international school option. =)


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05-28-2009, 12:57 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by xYinniex View Post
It's good for securing a second FLUENT language for sure and amazing at discipline that your kid will have asian core values taught to him inside and out and this will help with...overseas exams. I agree with you on that

But Japan has the hardest school exam in high school right? That's one heck of an achievement. But you don't have to move to a western country to give him that sort of education, about different people. There's always the international school option. =)
The fluency wouldn't be a huge problem, as I am referring, although not mentioned, a sibling with dual nationality, although I'm sure the language would afford more excellence. for the child.

I have no idea about high schooling exams in Japan, except to say I heard that graduating university is "easy", and "everyone" graduates.

The international schooling option in Japan, means big $$$, but then again, why would you move their if you didn't want them to "fit" in, afterall, being comfortable in Japan for kids means "fitting in".

On the other hand, it may be better having the child educated in an Asian country.

I made a mention of this as it was a huge stumbling block with my wife and I. I have some very close friends in a JP/Oz marriage, the Oz Dad used to towrk for a large JP newspaper, he is well clued up on Japan, and they opted in to return to Oz for the sake of their two girls before they reached 12.

The main problem in Japan for kids is that they are not taught "people skills".

They just lack the know how to respond to any other culture than Japanese, in Japanese..


Cheers - Oz
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06-17-2009, 08:16 AM

Given the choice, I'd opt for schooling in Japan.

The arguments that
The main problem in Japan for kids is that they are not taught "people skills".

They just lack the know how to respond to any other culture than Japanese, in Japanese..

float like a sieve.

Japanese middle and high schools have a range of clubs available which allow for students to interact in meaningful ways. Japanese schools at least to some degree uphold the principle that others have rights too. They also uphold, at least to some degree, the idea that people should be allowed to take pride in their own accomplishments.

Where are you going to find a school that teaches people skills? Not here, that's a cert.

graduating university is "easy", and "everyone" graduates.
I'm assuming you mean that it is easy to graduate to university from High School. Yup - high school is hard grind. The hard part is graduating from High School, not entering a university. Even elevator schools have a minimum standard that you have to actually pass year 12.

More to the point, ripping a child of 12 or younger out of a familiar environment and dumping them in unfamiliar surroundings doesn't do a whole lot of good for that child's emotional development. (Unless the first environment is actively detrimental, that is.)

Last edited by girigiri : 06-17-2009 at 08:19 AM.
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06-21-2009, 02:23 PM

Schooling is a topic of common discussion among parents. There are a number of issues that seem to call for community -parent-public actions. It is true that elementary classes in Japan seem to provide children with range of opportunities to develop their academic and social skills. It is at this stage they form their character and values. Their time has also to be shared with extre curricular activities and not in small part animation-computer related games and story sharing among friends. If you strictly want your children to master the standard texts and more, you would have reasons to worry for the content of the teaching materials seem basic and sometimes too elementary. Now...if you can spare time and help your child do some extra learning, reading from other texts and materials...you have helped a lot and your child would have little to miss even by global standard. If you cannot, you cannot tell by the grades in school for grading seem to have no way of ranking the performance of individual students. This problem seems to remain the same in high schools (both private and public) besides the big $$$$ you have to pay. It seems those kids who get extra help and encouragement to study would be ok and can join good colleges and always it is important to be involved in your child's education both in terms of time and funding.
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06-21-2009, 02:43 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ozkai View Post

The main problem in Japan for kids is that they are not taught "people skills".

They just lack the know how to respond to any other culture than Japanese, in Japanese..
What does "people skills" mean?

Almost 99% of the residents of Japan are Japanese.

90% of the non-Japanese are Chinese and Korean.

So if you are saying that Japanese are not officially taught to deal with 0.1% of the population of Japan of non-Asian foreigners, you are probably right. Though if I were making a budget and were asked what the priorities were, that issue would stand at a 0.1% priority.

Where I live the population is about 20% Hispanic, and I can't say that American students are taught "people skills" either.
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07-25-2009, 11:01 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MMM View Post
What does "people skills" mean?
Communication with people outside of the Japanese "ring".


Cheers - Oz
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07-25-2009, 11:25 AM

What kind of skills are you thinking about here? I can't say that I was taught to communicate with anyone but New Zealanders at school when I grew up- there was no kind of class dealing with intercultural communication, other than language classes, which were taught by New Zealanders.
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07-25-2009, 11:56 AM

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What kind of skills are you thinking about here? I can't say that I was taught to communicate with anyone but New Zealanders at school when I grew up- there was no kind of class dealing with intercultural communication, other than language classes, which were taught by New Zealanders.
If you lived in Japan long enough you may understand!


Cheers - Oz
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08-10-2009, 04:55 PM

The Western Europe educational systems are pretty much "alike". Its regular for students within the "European Union" to do inter-cambio (Students exchanges) for like an year or so. So that they can learn more about the country they are going to and interact with people from different countries.

Im going to start my 2nd year of University, but in my last highschool year i did exchange with some other student from Holland. Gosh, i learned so much with those liberal people! I miss Zaandam alot.

Guess thats a start for "people skills".


Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like.

Last edited by JasonTakeshi : 02-04-2010 at 09:07 PM.
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